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Jonah

The book of Jonah is a powerful illustration of God’s pursuit of prodigal people. Because of His love for the prodigal people of Ninevah, He wants to give them one more opportunity to repent before he brings destruction upon them. He chooses Jonah to be His messenger of grace. Jonah says no. Because of His love for this prodigal prophet, God doesn’t just let him run away. The story of Jonah is a message to God’s people across history: No matter how far you run (like Jonah or the Ninevites), God will be there waiting for you.

From this Series

You Can't Run That Far

January 4, 2018 by Mark Stuenzi Message 1 of 3

In chapter one, Jonah receives the call from God to go to Ninevah. His clear response is "No way." Rather than abandon Jonah to his stubbornness and move on to a more willing prophet, God graciously pursues Jonah. He uses a storm, the sailors' casting of lots, and a huge fish to get Jonah back on track. No matter where we run or how much pain we experience along the way, God will meet us there.

Desperate

February 11, 2018 by Dan White Message 2 of 3

The second chapter of the book of Jonah is very much like a Psalm. It is the poetic record of Jonah's prayer while in the belly of the fish. The prayer is really a celebration of Jonah's deliverance from drowning in the sea (Jonah saw the fish as God's means of deliverance). In this prayer, Jonah reminds himself of several key aspects of God's character: God's mercy; God's sovereignty; God's grace; and God's power.

Take Two

February 18, 2018 by Dan White Message 3 of 3

The third chapter of Jonah describes a great revival in the city of Nineveh. While it took a great deal of "divine persuasion" to get Jonah to obey God, it only took one sermon for the Ninevites to turn around. However, instead of rejoicing in their change of heart, Jonah is angry and critical toward God. We who have experienced the grace of God should be the most willing to display the grace of God toward others.